What is a Liberal Arts Education?

Dan Peterson
During faculty training in August, Josh Simmons, our Associate Head of School of Rhetoric, did a masterful job of giving a macro-perspective of liberal arts education to our faculty team. We videoed the teaching and while it is not exceptional in quality, I believe it is a valuable tool for you to view and learn about some of our key underpinnings as a school. Watch here.
Regents is a classical and Christian school by purpose and mission. We aim to provide this model of education to our students and families. What does it mean to be a classical and Christian school? Part of the answer is that our pedagogy centers around the Trivium – a Latin word meaning “the place where three roads converge.” The three roads – grammar, logic, and rhetoric – is the very nomenclature we use for our school divisions. The classical tradition is directly tied to the liberal arts education. In the work Philosophy and Education, George Knight, shares, “Liberal education in the classical tradition revolved around those studies that made people free and truly human, as opposed to the training that people received to do specific tasks in the world of work.” The tradition of liberal education is for human flourishment. Ultimately, we desire to provide an educational tool belt that allows our graduates to have the framework, ability, and desire to be lifelong learners.
 
During faculty training in August, Josh Simmons, our Associate Head of School of Rhetoric, did a masterful job of giving a macro-perspective of liberal arts education to our faculty team. We videoed the teaching and while it is not exceptional in quality, I believe it is a valuable tool for you to view and learn about some of our key underpinnings as a school. It is my hope and intent that our entire school community knows and understands our identity as a school.
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