A Word from Liz Benigno, Head of School of Rhetoric

Liz Benigno
The next time you see a high school student walking across campus, stop and pray for them. Pray that in the midst of transitioning from child to adult they feel loved and cared for by their whole community and that the Lord would capture their hearts.
I love teenagers. I love their emotional, growing, transitioning, figuring-it-out selves. But, I'll be honest with you, while you can find me reminiscing about my adult children when they were in kindergarten, second, and even middle school, you will never hear me reminisce about having teenagers in the house. Teens are a curious bunch - independent, delightful, hardworking, thoughtful, weepy, irritable, questioning, and that's in a single day!
 
Our Rhetoric students have a particular challenge because they are becoming adults on a K-12 campus. From their point of view, they are under the ever watchful eye of not only their parents, teachers, and coaches, but every parent on the campus. They can drive too fast in the parking lot, they can be large and loud walking across the campus, they are forever rumpled and as close to out of uniform as possible, and heaven forbid one of them gets themselves into a bit of trouble outside of school, it seems as if everyone knows.
 
But, I for one, think this is a great "problem" to have. It is a rare opportunity for teenagers these days to have expectations of them. What a great place to learn that the world doesn't actually revolve around you and you best drive safely because others are depending on your maturity. Do you know our seniors come to school early several times a year just so they can go to the first 30 minutes of school with their kinder buddy? It may not sound like a big deal, but on these days they can't be late lest they deeply disappoint a five-year-old, and who wants to do that? Instead of taking the day off and skipping their duty our high school students serve at Grandparents Day, Fine Arts Christmas Festival, and Regents Cup. Our teenagers are normal with normal everyday struggles, temptations, decisions, but the difference is our high school students are surrounded by godly men and women who are exhorting them to a higher standard all the while loving them and cheering them on.
 
The next time you see a high school student walking across campus, stop and pray for them. Pray that in the midst of transitioning from child to adult they feel loved and cared for by their whole community and that the Lord would capture their hearts.
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